Book review & giveaway 3: Ukiyo-e; The Art of the Japanese Print

10 Sep

I have reviewed some books from Tuttle Publishing (One about Japanese Architecture and another was a Japanese language study tool) and they gave a free copy of each book to random visitors to my blog.

Now, Tuttle Publishing has given me two more books to review on my blog here…and, once again, they will be giving (gave) one free copy of each book to a random visitor of my blog!

The next book that I will be reviewing is titled “Ukiyo-e: The Art of the Japanese Print” by Frederick Harris.

ukiyoe

The details of the book giveaway will be at the end of this review.

The author, Mr. Harris, is an expert on ukiyoe. He has been living in Tokyo for over fifty years and has an art studio here.

This book will appeal to anyone who’s interested in traditional Japanese culture (even if you don’t know about Japanese woodblock prints), interested in ukiyoe (whether you don’t know much about the art or you’re very knowledgeable on the subject), or interested in art in general.

As for me, I’m interested in ukiyoe (I’ve written a few “ukiyoe-related” posts, including this one).

I especially like ukiyoe pictures of Japanese monsters. So, I was a bit disappointed that this book doesn’t have more information and photos of this particular type of ukiyoe.
But, I guess that’s to be expected since woodblock paintings of monsters aren’t nearly as popular as other subjects.

That’s a minor issue anyways, because this is an excellent and comprehensive book.

It is a large, hardcover book full of beautiful photos of all types and styles of ukiyoe prints. It also explains the meaning of the details in the artwork. The hairstyles, types of kimono worn, etc all have meanings!
The book also explains the incredible work and effort that is required to make a ukiyoe painting.
As well as, how to care for a print if you decide to start your own collection.

It’s a wonderful book.

I must mention one thing that could potentially make you rethink adding this book to your collection:
It contains one 10-page chapter of very explicit ukiyoe prints.

Just like artists in any culture or era, many ukiyoe artist often freelanced to earn a living.
They would often design posters and flyers to be used as advertisements for upcoming kabuki shows or sumo matches, as well as do private portraits…and sometimes p○rn0gr@phy (intentionally misspelled by me to avoid attracting spam).

To tell the truth, I was a bit taken aback by the inclusion of this chapter. I knew this type of ukiyoe existed, but I’ve never seen them included in a ukiyoe book or exhibit.

Because these photos are included, I don’t recommend this book where children would access it…such as a school art class and such. But, for adults who don’t mind explicit artwork, I do recommend this book.

Outside of that one chapter, the rest of the photos are the more “common” ukiyoe subjects: geisha, sumo, kabuki, nature, etc.

Ukiyo-e: The Art of the Japanese Print” can be purchased through Amazon here.

As I mentioned above though, the publisher has kindly agreed to give (given) away one free copy of this book to a random visitor to my blog!

To enter the drawing for a chance to win the free book, simply submit the following form by Saturday, 2014 September 27th:

***** Updated September 28th, 2014 *****

This special promo ended on 2014 September 27th. One random winner was selected and contacted directly by Tuttle Publishers (via email) with the details about the free book.

Thank you to all who entered, but only the winner was contacted.
*****

9 Responses to “Book review & giveaway 3: Ukiyo-e; The Art of the Japanese Print”

  1. tokyo5 September 25, 2014 at 11:21 am #

    Only two more days to enter the drawing for this book.

    Like

  2. tokyo5 September 14, 2014 at 1:35 am #

    There’s another drawing for a free book on my blog. Here:
    https://tokyo5.wordpress.com/2014/09/14/book-review4-yokai/

    Like

  3. Cassandra September 13, 2014 at 1:16 am #

    I feel I would read this to discover more of Japanese culture which tends to fascinate me. I am not bothered by the explicit portions you say popped up because art often has that so called explicit side to it. Thanks for the review ^-^

    Like

    • tokyo5 September 13, 2014 at 11:35 pm #

      Yes, there is a lot of explicit or graphic art around the world…but it can be a shock if you’re not expecting it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Cassandra September 13, 2014 at 11:46 pm #

        It can. Thanks for the review. I enjoyed reading.

        Like

      • tokyo5 September 14, 2014 at 12:01 am #

        Thanks.

        Like

  4. Jd Banks September 10, 2014 at 11:59 am #

    I love ukiyo-e! I studied it in college while I was taking Japanese art history. I even wrote a post about Utagawa Hiroshige (my favorite ukiyo-e artist) recently (http://jadesescape.com/2014/09/10/a-try-in-japonism/) inspired by a Japanese book of Hiroshige from the もっと知りたい (Want to Know More) series. I do think that though this book you’re giving away has an adult section, it’s good to show a history of all the work ukiyo-e artists were doing at the time. I know that Utamaro (artist of Three Beauties of the Present Day) and Kuniyoshi Utagawa (artist of Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre) created these illicit scenes to be able to sell when times were rough in the Edo Period.

    Like

    • tokyo5 September 10, 2014 at 12:36 pm #

      >I love ukiyo-e!

      Do you? Why don’t you enter the drawing for the book then?

      >I even wrote a post

      I saw your post. You’re a good artist!

      >I know that Utamaro…and Kuniyoshi Utagawa…created these illicit scenes to be able to sell when times were rough in the Edo Period.

      Yes, just like artists everywhere…many ukiyoe artists freelanced.

      Like

  5. tokyo5 September 10, 2014 at 9:53 am #

    This is my 1000th blog post!

    Like

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