Archive | June, 2009

マックでDS

30 Jun

マックドナルド (McDonalds Japan) has started a new tie-in with Nintendo.

It’s 「マックでDS」 (“Mac De DS“)…which means “(Nintendo) DS at McDonalds”.

mac-de_ds

If you’re in Japan, and you or your kids have a Nintendo DS, bring it with you on your next visit to マックドナルド (McDonalds)…and you (or your kids) will be able to play games that are available only while you’re inside a マックドナルド (McDonalds) in Japan, download マックドナルド (McDonalds) coupons and “Pokemon” characters and things like that.

I haven’t been to マックドナルド (McDonalds) recently, so I’ve haven’t tried this yet…but the next time that my kids go to McDonalds (either with us or with their friends), they’ll probably bring along their “DS” to try this service out.

Vodka and cola

28 Jun

I mentioned my preference for beer over cola on an earlier post (Click here to read it).

But on 七月八日 ((2009) July 8), Kirin (the Japanese beverage company most famous for their line of beers) will begin selling 「コーラショック」 (“Cola Shock”).

キリン「コーラショック」 (Kirin "Cola Shock")

キリン「コーラショック」 (Kirin "Cola Shock")

It’s a canned cola and vodka cocktail.

The ad says that it’s a 発泡酒 (Low-malt alcoholic beverage) that contains アルコール分5% (5% alcohol).

As I mentioned before, I don’t drink cola often…but this is one kind I’d like! 😉

回転寿司

26 Jun

Today my wife and I went to a Levi’s outlet sale in 新宿 (Shinjuku, Tokyo).

We bought some clothes for our kids.

While we were in 新宿 (Shinjuku), we had lunch at 三葉回転寿司 (Mitsuba conveyor-belt sushi).

Do they have 回転寿司 (conveyor-belt sushi) restaurants in your country?

At this type of sushi restaurant, the sushi chef prepares various types of sushi and puts them on different colored plates. Each colored plate represents the price for that particular sushi.

Then the sushi is placed on a conveyor-belt and goes around and when the one you want passes in front of you, you can take it off and eat it.

When you’re ready to leave, the restaurant staff calculates how much you owe by counting the colored plates from all the sushi you ate.

You can also request the sushi chef to make a particular sushi that you want, if you don’t see it on the conveyor.

Here are a few photos I took of the sushi and around 新宿 (Shinjuku):

フグ (Blowfish) skin

フグ (Blowfish) skin

DSCF5094

DSCF5096

DSCF5097

This building in Shinjuku has banners advertising Tokyo's bid for the 2016 Olympics.

This building in Shinjuku has banners advertising Tokyo's bid for the 2016 Olympics.

The banner says: 「Tokyo 2016. 日本だから、できる。 あたらしいオリンピック」 ("Tokyo 2016. This is Japan, so we can can do it...a new Olympics")

The banner says: 「Tokyo 2016. 日本だから、できる。 あたらしいオリンピック!」 ("Tokyo 2016. This is Japan, so we can can do it...a new Olympics!")

DSCF5103

American 80s icons died

26 Jun

A couple of weeks ago, David Carredine, famous from the U.S. TV show “Kung Fu” from the 70s / 80s died.

Then two days ago, Ed McMahon, famous from the “Tonight Show” and “Star Search” died.

Yesterday, Farrah Fawcett from “Charlie’s Angels” died.

And right now, the TV morning variety shows are saying Michael Jackson may have just died.

New drinks

26 Jun

I wrote about Pepsi Japan‘s new drink that they started selling this week called Pepsi Shiso.
(Click here to read it).

I decided to buy a bottle of it today to try it just for the novelty value.

"Pepsi Shiso" on the convenience store shelf.

"Pepsi Shiso" on the convenience store shelf.

I know what シソ (Shiso), the Japanese herb, tastes like. We actually have some growing in my wife’s garden right now.
I like it fine…but the idea of “Shiso flavored cola” seemed very odd to me.

I was right. Pepsi Shiso smells and tastes alot like the herb. As I said, I think Shiso is good…as an herb. But in a cola, I found it unappealing.

I took a couple sips to try it, and gave the rest of the drink to my kids. Even they found it “mediocre”.

I guess we won’t be buying Pepsi Shiso again.

After trying the Pepsi Shiso, I opened my favorite drink…an ice cold beer! (Actually a 発泡酒 (Low-malt beer), which is just as good to me).

Yesterday, I bought a case of Kirin Beer‘s newest offering: 「コクの時間」 (I would’ve translated it as “Wonderful Time“…but it says on the can “Golden Moments“).

kokunojikan

Regardless, the beer was much better than the herb cola! (Actually, a cold beer is better than any other drink! 🙂 )

MOS Bears

24 Jun

The Japanese fast-food chain MOS Burger is now offering a “Kids Set Meal” for the first time in their history.

Also if you buy any burger / small fries / medium drink set at MOS Burger from now until 2009 July 6, you’ll get a scratch card that gives you a chance to win your choice of a “MOS Burger Bearbrick Figure” or a “Pepsi NEX Bearbrick Figure“.

mos-bear

mos-scratch

Bearbrick is a Japanese company that makes bear figures in the likeness of famous people or things. Mostly pop-culture related.

I wrote a couple posts about them before.
Click here to see my KISS Bearbrick post…
and click here to see my post with the Star Wars figures.

Wild Health

24 Jun

Do you know 安室奈美恵 (Amuro Namie)?

She is a Japanese pop singer.

I remember when she debuted in the early 1990’s at the age of about 14…now she’s already about 31! Time flies!

She’s from Okinawa and she originally debuted in a band called “Super Monkey“. They weren’t so popular though, and she went solo.
The rest of the Super Monkey band remained together and changed their name to “MAX“.

The band MAX was moderately successful…but 安室奈美恵 (Amuro Namie) became extremely popular in Japan in the 1990s.

Many Japanese girls copied her style of clothes and hair. Many people think that 安室奈美恵 (Amuro Namie) started the style that became popular in the mid-1990s in Japan of having bleached hair.

At the height of her popularity, 安室奈美恵 (Amuro Namie) got married to a member of the Japanese pop band TRF and they had a son together.
But their marriage didn’t last long and they were divorced.

And then, news was reported that her mother was violently murdered in Okinawa by her step-father’s brother…who then killed himself.

I’m not particularly a fan of 安室奈美恵 (Amuro Namie). I don’t listen to that type of music.
But I remember her being on television here in Japan all of the time in the early to mid 1990s. And I remember how many young Japanese girls copied her style back then too.
And I remember when the news of her mother’s news was on TV too. (Her mother was half-Italian, by the way).

Then I forgot all about her when her popularity diminished.
But recently, she’s making a bit of a come-back.

She’s started showing up on the music shows on TV a few years ago. And she has a few fairly new tattoos that she shows off alot.
One tattoo is a bar-code with the date-of-birth on it.
Another is the name of her son, Haruto.
And the one above her son’s name is a “R.I.P.” tattoo dedicated to her late mother.

And now, 安室奈美恵 (Amuro Namie) is the current campaign model for both Coca-Cola Japan‘s “Zero” cola.
Her campaign ad for Coca-Cola Zero says “Wild Health”.

amuro-coke

(Click here to read my other blog post about Coke (and Pepsi) in Japan.)

And she’s also the current campaign model for McDonalds Japan‘s “Quarter Pounder” burger ads.

amuro-mac

(Click here to read my earlier post about the Quarter Pounder in Japan.)

The Quarter Pounder in Japan had been using the colors black and red in their ads…but for some reason they’ve changed the color to what their calling 「バラ色」 (“Rose color”)…(it’s actually pink, though).

And if you buy a Quarter Pounder set meal in Japan now, you can get a pink (sorry, “Rose color”) pin with one of a choice of strange designs…and you’ll also get a scratch-card that gives you a chance to win a pink T-shirt with the same choices of designs.

Personally, I would never wear a pink T-shirt…especially one from a fast-food restaurant. The designs offered are like this one:

read-air

If you don’t understand Japanese, a T-shirt that says “Don’t Read Air” must seem strange. But it’s obviously meant to be a literal English translation of 空気が読めない (“Can’t read between the lines”).
A better literal translation would be “Can’t read the air”. But what it means is “Can’t read between the lines”…which is important in Japanese culture.